Extreme Weather Hits Home – Weblog

May 3, 2008

2008 Tornado Trends

Filed under: High Winds — Tags: , , , — John Banta @ 5:22 am

April is usually the start of tornado season in the US. This year we got off to an early start, and that is continuing. As of today the Arkansas death toll is up to 24. The following chart plots the number of tornadoes for 2008 in red. We are well on the way to setting a record breaking year.

NOAA: http://www.spc.noaa.gov/wcm/

According to NOAA the current ten year average tornado trend is 1270 tornadoes per year. Prior to 2000 there was only one year that exceeded 1000.

February 15, 2008

Unusual February Tornados

Filed under: High Winds — Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , — John Banta @ 5:15 am

tornados2008.jpg

Last month I posted that we were experiencing unusually early tornadoes in January. This unusual activity is continuing on into February with deadly results. Tornados can occur in any month, but they usually don’t become frequent until April peaking in August. This year we have already had a record setting number of tornados (291 by February 14th).  According to the Institute for Business and Home Safety

“In 2001, a total of 1,081 tornadoes hit 43 states and killed 37 people.” “The only other year on record when the total number of tornadoes went over 1,000 was in 1973 when a record number of 1,102 twister hits.”

 

 

Pretty incredible!

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On January 1, 2008 I started a new blog called 1:5:10:365. On it I am posting a daily tip for becoming a better steward for our homes and planet. Today I posted an out of order tip regarding emergency alert radios.

Please check out my new blog at: 

http://1510365blog.wordpress.com/category/latest-1510365-tips/057-urgent-tip-emergency-weather-radio/

January 29, 2008

Explanation for Hurricane Reduction

Filed under: High Winds — Tags: , , , , — John Banta @ 8:07 am

According to an article published by Reuters, scientists have published a study in the Geophysical Research Letters Journal that indicates rising ocean temperatures may create conditions that reduce the number of hurricanes by causing a vertical wind shear that tears the Atlantic Ocean storms apart at different altitudes and prevents the hurricane from being able to form. http://uk.reuters.com/article/email/idUKN23640879._CH_.242020080123

If this is true it would means that hurricanes would have a limited temperature range in which they can form. If the ocean is too cold – there isn’t enough energy. If the ocean is too hot – the energy is too extreme and leads to an atomosheric chaos too great for storms to form.

If this is true – it demonstrates further that we have a lot to learn about our climate and the extremes that are being produced.

I’m not a climatologist but if I am reading this correctly, this study may help explain the Atlantic hurricane respite we have experienced over the last two years. It may also help explain the increase in hurricanes and tropical storms hitting the west coast of Mexico and Southern California.

My book Extreme Weather Hits Home has lots of information about how to prepare our buildings to better withstand these uncertain times and the extreme and constantly shifting conditions . If you can’t find it at your local bookseller, ask them to order it.

October 14, 2007

Hurricane Penetration

Filed under: High Winds — John Banta @ 3:50 am

52b-hurricane-penetration-noaa0214.jpg

Projected Inland Penetration for 65 knot or greater winds when a maximum hurricane wind speed of 135 knots and 24-knot velocity of advance strikes the U.S. Gulf Coast.

Source National Center for Environmental Predictions: National Hurricane Center.

Hurricane Penetration

Filed under: High Winds — John Banta @ 3:47 am

052a-hurricane-penetration-noaa0212.jpg

Projected Inland Penetration for 65 knot or greater winds when a maximum hurricane wind speed of 135 knots and 24-knot velocity of advance strikes the U.S. Atlantic Coast.

Source National Center for Environmental Predictions: National Hurricane Center.

Hurricane Penetration

Filed under: High Winds — John Banta @ 3:40 am

US Atlantic Hurricane Penetration

Projected Inland Penetration for 65 knot winds when a maximum hurricane wind speed of 135 knots and 24-knot velocity of advance strikes the U.S. Atlantic Coast.

Source: National Center for Environmental Predictions: National Hurricane Center

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